Posts Tagged ‘mixed media’

A 12″ square deep gallery wrapped canvas with mixed media consisting of painting and collage, with a tad of journaling. There is to be a solo show in September after all plans were finalized in the last couple of days. The wall space is large and there is a table also for smaller works. I will be working throughout the summer, thankfully indoors, completing works for Trashion Fashion photo shoot in late june and the event July 21, and then for the show in september. Lots to do, just getting my feet wet today and back into mixed media from the accessory frenzy in May.

I’m working on several tote bags for the Trashion Fashion show at ARTpool Gallery in July. This one features an original photograph, Asian newspaper, napkins and tissue. I put a very thin wash of gesso over the top of all the components and scrubbed most of it off, to unify the elements a tad. I will probably do some additional surface design to soften the edges of the photo, perhaps some stenciling on the darker parts of the photo or some stamping. I found these totes, about half a dozen all the same, at a thrift store for $1 each. They are canvas-y material and had the company’s imprint on them. Easy to cover that up with a photo. I usually start the process by gesso-ing the front of the bag in white and I leave the sides black for the graphic quality.

I learned yesterday that as part of my participation showing my altered purses in Trashion Fashion at ARTpool Gallery in July I need to style and accessorize seven models for the runway. YIKES! My experience in runway fashion happens on Lifetime Thursday evenings glued to to the tube. Anyway, the glove has been thrown down. The idea of this fashion show is that the featured items are 50% trash or thrift type finds. I love the flower look of the bottom of this soda bottle (it is a small bottle, not the honking soda size). I am also considering drink umbrellas, altered child sized umbrellas and medalions made from yo yo’s with vintage pin centers, some vintage embroidery or crochet,using repurposed chain necklaces etc. I need headgear, necklace, bracelet (obviously the purses I entered in the show originally are the star accessory) and something for the models to carry. That’s where I thought of umbrellas as delightful parasols. Any ideas out there how to make great fashion items ON THE CHEAP and out of junk? Or the most inexpensive place to find kid’s umbrellas?

A bunch of stuff graces this page. The background was spray inked and I stamped a hand carved dandelion plant image (from Quik Cutz, not a styrofoam plate this time) onto the foundation. Then I began to layer on some ephemer. There are ration stamps, an epsom salt RX envelope, business cards, word cards, more RX labels and some Victorian scrap, plus a lotteria card. The cigar bands and red tickets create somewhat of a border around the dandelion image, and a cute little girl from what could be a paper doll sheet finishes the edge. This page does not feel finished to me. I think it needs a very thin wash of gesso or white acrylic to unify the items, or some journaling in white would accomplish the same idea.

Another of my styrofoam plate prints, this time printed and over painted onto canvas board. The image is all on one plate and printed in black. I love how the styrofoam prints end up looking like graffiti, and to that end I thought I’d spiff some of them up with color. The wonder of these prints is that you never know how they will turn out. A face can have many expressions depending on where the paint settles into the crevices of the plate. One thing about painting the image is you can define areas and change the print a bit. This is a face with a tic tac toe body; grids are fun to carve and usually look cool printed.

I fell in love with a scrapbook set of papers with a Japanese theme a couple of weeks ago. It had the usual back up accessories, like chipboard pop outs, stickers and alphabets. The little geisha and the bird were two of my favorite images from the set so I put them together. I was out in the garage and found this very stuffed but flat backed geisha doll and wondered if it is possible to go THAT 3-D in an art journal. Well, it is but with some caveats. First of all, your paper needs to be up to the task of holding the piece in place. This is my new go to Montval watercolor paper journal (90#) from Canson (the All Media I’ve already spoken of several times). The paper is pretty heavy, so that wasn’t a problem. Also, I set the found object geisha toward the spine, which would be my second suggestion: placement on the page. Third issue is that I forgot that this wasn’t a “stand alone” project like so many of mine are…soooooo, it is a tad tough to journal on the preceding half dozen pages. They are all lumpy. Because the top of the geisha is all stuffed and junk. So keep that in mind. One thing that would be SMART, so it never occurred to ME, would be to plan to have the stuffed geisha on the page but not actually PUT it on the page until you got any page effected by it finished, like the previously discussed preceding half dozen pages. Duh. Anyway, learn from my mistakes, grasshoppah. Don’t let the 3-Dness of an item immediately negate the idea of it in your art journal, but take my advice and do a little planning first. Think how it’s going to effect the rest of your work nearby. By the way, at the National Scrapbookers Day event I demo’d at this past Saturday, this page was popular. It definitely offers the unexpected as you flip through the book. p.s. Bamboo was stenciled with Dylusions ink. Awesome.

A simple grid over a two page spread became the foundation for these calendar journal pages. The upper left box contains a Crafter’s Workshop stencil image sprayed with Dylusions spray ink. I love dandelions and couldn’t wait to use this stencil. I hope you can at least see some of the watercolor effect the Dylusions spray ink had, and I love the intermixability of these inks. As you can see not each square of the grid has journaling. I used scrapbook paper scraps and turned the dandelion stencil wet side down after spraying the main image to get color on the right bottom center and right near bottom square. I do not like wasting ink!! Because the stencils are plastic the overspray stays wet a long time and it can be monoprinted onto any other page or project you have going. I put an opened up cardboard slide holder on the bottom right square and stamped “April” on the bottom right with what I believe is a 7 Gypsies journal rubber stamp set. I liked prepping and using this spread so much that it is now the second class in my Art Journal series beginning in a couple of weeks at Whim So Doodle in St. Pete. Prepping is easy. Draw the grid, watercolor into each square by mixing your colors and making each square a different color, spray some with ink, use a stencil that you like that goes along with the month you are working on. Or draw or doodle into squares to make it even more personal. Pick a square to stamp your month into, use a box style to write the date in each square that will be for journal writing. Put something cool in the remaining squares for visual interest. Then every day all you have to do is show up with a pen and write a few sentences into the appropriate square. Easy peasey.

I picked up about half a dozen black edged canvas totes at a thrift store a while back and decided to alter them with photography and mixed media. The mannaquin photo is an original, altered a bit in Elements. That is a flattened drink umbrella in the upper right corner and a sassy crow image from Kerry Carbary in the upper left. The rest is tissue paper, asian newspaper, stenciling and rub-0n letters. The other side is collaged in a similar manner. This bag is about 4 years old but I notice my style hasn’t changed all that much. These materials remain favorites, as does my love of mannaquins as photo fodder. This tote and several other altered purses will be featured in the Trashion Fashion show at ARTpool Gallery in July. The first time any of my wearables have been in a show. Yippee!

It’s a bit hard to tell in this photo what we’re looking at. The foundation is a piece of scrapbook paper designed by Tim Holtz. On top of that is a quilted collage that is stitched together, made entirely of paper items, which in turn has been stitched down to the foundation. The top layer is one of my stitched collages made from both fabric and paper that did not suit me after it was done, so I cut it up into heart shapes to use on future stitched collages. The “waste” as it might be called, was then stitched overtop the two previous pieces. This is one of those items that loses a little in photographic translation…it is easier to see what you are looking at IRL and to discern what it is.

Close cropping is nothing new to photographers but I think as artists we sometimes forget that in every composition it is possible to find small, interesting bits that can stand on their own. Particularly when it comes to what the human mind finds intriguing, such as faces of humans and animals, body parts of same, etc. Also in our images it is possible to find small arrangements of odd numbered items or marks that make a substantial impact on their own if cropped. I find that cropping “busy” subjects, such as the graffiti I’ve featured on this blog frequently, lets the mind appreciate what is there in smaller mind-sized “bites”. While a wide angle shot (or full shot) documents a piece, a close crop provides more of a study.