Posts Tagged ‘new art work’

mushroomfairy

I spent most of yesterday morning playing with dendritic monoprinting on pieces of blank or previously painted Rives BFK® printmaking paper. Remember I am doing a Daily Art project and I have an hour to get it all done (or as done as it’s going to get). Even though the paper here was pre-painted, I was still pushed by the clock to get it finished.

As I’ve mentioned in previous posts, I particularly enjoy expressive art practice. I don’t draw well enough to plan and execute a design. Somehow when I start with a rough random pattern I do much better. If you can imagine the image before I outlined and worked into it you might see that there were three pieces of dentritic printing on the page. (The dendritic patterns are the indigo fern-ish marks). The first is the large focal point that I turned into a mushroom. It really did look mushroom-like from the get go. The second painted shape was the small circle at bottom left, and at top middle there was an oblong shape. Then there was the predominant rainbow striping to deal with. Before I worked into it, it was a hodge-podge-lodge of dramatic patterns. I actually despaired of it, thinking it was a hard challenge under any circumstances. But I persevered and started on the mushroom and it went pretty well. The I thought the smaller circle could be a less mature sprout; some mushrooms have that puff ball look when they are babies. I duplicated the colors except to make the yellow bolder with a tad of orange.

Now, I have two finished mushrooms on a striped rainbow with an obnoxious small oblong shape. It had all these little dentrites on the edges and the inside was empty. I decided to try a face shape around it and that meant I had to try and match a drawn eye to the painted one (or produce a Cyclops. EEEWW). This always fills me with horror; matching eyes is always problematic.  I am great with ONE eye (well, great might be an overstatement).  One looks good, and the other one that should match gets lumpy or squinty or looks like the subject is giving the Stink Eye. I braved through it with a colored pencil and actually got a pretty good match, if I do say so myself. And I just did. The nose and mouth weren’t much of anything to do, and I figured we’d carry that dentritic pattern up to the hair; looks like a root crown to me. Unless this is a self-portrait of me getting down on my belly to see a mushroom (and that does happen pretty frequently; there are photos involved to prove it) I figured she to be a fairy and gave her dragonfly wings or a reasonable facsimile of them. With all the detail and red up top, the bottom needed some red for balance so I did little tulips and added green and ochre around the base of the mushrooms to ground them. I then ran out of time.

I don’t know if I would have done more given the time. I very much like this piece. It was a challenge and I did some drawing which is always a good thing. I resist drawing most of the time but this was the perfect situation to do some expressive work. I do think the mushroom and face compete because of the details and size. Generally we conceive of fairies SITTING on a mushroom, not looming over them like Godzilla. But who are we to know what a nature spirit looks like? She looks benevolent enough, if a little pensive, as if she has a big “To Do” list today. Definitely not giving the dreaded Stink Eye.

You probably want to know how I came to do dendritic painting, or what it is. I don’t know what got me there, but I watched Shannon Green on YouTube University demonstrating it. She got it from somebody else which is how we all learn. Basically, it involves two pieces of strong glass, acrylic paint, pressure and lift, then two prints. You can sometimes get two prints off each plate, but the second prints are not great. Good for scrap paper, though.

I have way too much scrapbook paper for someone who doesn’t scrapbook. I probably have way too much scrapbook paper for someone who DOES scrapbook. And to be honest, I don’t know why I do because I have no interest in it. I think most of it was just there, like Mount Everest. I decided the dentritic monoprinting was going to feel very good on all that scrapbook paper. And it does. I made good use of it in today’s Daily project, but that is for later to show.

If you have a bunch of paper you want to make more attractive, get yourself the supplies I listed above and watch Shannon’s video. It’s easy, inexpensive and fun. No two patterns are the same. If you don’t like glass, or have kids involved, try it on sheet protectors or transparencies, or maybe use cut acrylic sheet. It is the stucked-ness and air bubbles and release of pressure (suction) that makes the dendrites.  I plan on trying transparencies because I hate glass and sharp stuff like grim death.

A 12″ square deep gallery wrapped canvas with mixed media consisting of painting and collage, with a tad of journaling. There is to be a solo show in September after all plans were finalized in the last couple of days. The wall space is large and there is a table also for smaller works. I will be working throughout the summer, thankfully indoors, completing works for Trashion Fashion photo shoot in late june and the event July 21, and then for the show in september. Lots to do, just getting my feet wet today and back into mixed media from the accessory frenzy in May.

I’m working on several tote bags for the Trashion Fashion show at ARTpool Gallery in July. This one features an original photograph, Asian newspaper, napkins and tissue. I put a very thin wash of gesso over the top of all the components and scrubbed most of it off, to unify the elements a tad. I will probably do some additional surface design to soften the edges of the photo, perhaps some stenciling on the darker parts of the photo or some stamping. I found these totes, about half a dozen all the same, at a thrift store for $1 each. They are canvas-y material and had the company’s imprint on them. Easy to cover that up with a photo. I usually start the process by gesso-ing the front of the bag in white and I leave the sides black for the graphic quality.

A new page in my watercolor journal. I’m calling them Poem Pages. The journaling derives from a writing assignment having to do with a favorite color and “I am” statements. The poem is written on watercolor paper and then washed in a light to medium tone. The statements are cut out and perhaps rearranged into a poetic collection. From there is is a matter of rewriting the poem in pen and doing some outlining of the handwriting to make it pop. I think it looks cooler in person than in the pix, plus it’s very overcast here today so not a lot of light in the photography station (ha! my dining chair in the kitchen!). Pick your favorite anything, write out what it’s like to be it, and make a poem today in your journal. This exercise will appear as Class Three in Art Journaling at Whim So Doodle in St. Pete, FL sometime in July.

A bunch of stuff graces this page. The background was spray inked and I stamped a hand carved dandelion plant image (from Quik Cutz, not a styrofoam plate this time) onto the foundation. Then I began to layer on some ephemer. There are ration stamps, an epsom salt RX envelope, business cards, word cards, more RX labels and some Victorian scrap, plus a lotteria card. The cigar bands and red tickets create somewhat of a border around the dandelion image, and a cute little girl from what could be a paper doll sheet finishes the edge. This page does not feel finished to me. I think it needs a very thin wash of gesso or white acrylic to unify the items, or some journaling in white would accomplish the same idea.

Another of my styrofoam plate prints, this time printed and over painted onto canvas board. The image is all on one plate and printed in black. I love how the styrofoam prints end up looking like graffiti, and to that end I thought I’d spiff some of them up with color. The wonder of these prints is that you never know how they will turn out. A face can have many expressions depending on where the paint settles into the crevices of the plate. One thing about painting the image is you can define areas and change the print a bit. This is a face with a tic tac toe body; grids are fun to carve and usually look cool printed.

I fell in love with a scrapbook set of papers with a Japanese theme a couple of weeks ago. It had the usual back up accessories, like chipboard pop outs, stickers and alphabets. The little geisha and the bird were two of my favorite images from the set so I put them together. I was out in the garage and found this very stuffed but flat backed geisha doll and wondered if it is possible to go THAT 3-D in an art journal. Well, it is but with some caveats. First of all, your paper needs to be up to the task of holding the piece in place. This is my new go to Montval watercolor paper journal (90#) from Canson (the All Media I’ve already spoken of several times). The paper is pretty heavy, so that wasn’t a problem. Also, I set the found object geisha toward the spine, which would be my second suggestion: placement on the page. Third issue is that I forgot that this wasn’t a “stand alone” project like so many of mine are…soooooo, it is a tad tough to journal on the preceding half dozen pages. They are all lumpy. Because the top of the geisha is all stuffed and junk. So keep that in mind. One thing that would be SMART, so it never occurred to ME, would be to plan to have the stuffed geisha on the page but not actually PUT it on the page until you got any page effected by it finished, like the previously discussed preceding half dozen pages. Duh. Anyway, learn from my mistakes, grasshoppah. Don’t let the 3-Dness of an item immediately negate the idea of it in your art journal, but take my advice and do a little planning first. Think how it’s going to effect the rest of your work nearby. By the way, at the National Scrapbookers Day event I demo’d at this past Saturday, this page was popular. It definitely offers the unexpected as you flip through the book. p.s. Bamboo was stenciled with Dylusions ink. Awesome.

A simple grid over a two page spread became the foundation for these calendar journal pages. The upper left box contains a Crafter’s Workshop stencil image sprayed with Dylusions spray ink. I love dandelions and couldn’t wait to use this stencil. I hope you can at least see some of the watercolor effect the Dylusions spray ink had, and I love the intermixability of these inks. As you can see not each square of the grid has journaling. I used scrapbook paper scraps and turned the dandelion stencil wet side down after spraying the main image to get color on the right bottom center and right near bottom square. I do not like wasting ink!! Because the stencils are plastic the overspray stays wet a long time and it can be monoprinted onto any other page or project you have going. I put an opened up cardboard slide holder on the bottom right square and stamped “April” on the bottom right with what I believe is a 7 Gypsies journal rubber stamp set. I liked prepping and using this spread so much that it is now the second class in my Art Journal series beginning in a couple of weeks at Whim So Doodle in St. Pete. Prepping is easy. Draw the grid, watercolor into each square by mixing your colors and making each square a different color, spray some with ink, use a stencil that you like that goes along with the month you are working on. Or draw or doodle into squares to make it even more personal. Pick a square to stamp your month into, use a box style to write the date in each square that will be for journal writing. Put something cool in the remaining squares for visual interest. Then every day all you have to do is show up with a pen and write a few sentences into the appropriate square. Easy peasey.

It’s a bit hard to tell in this photo what we’re looking at. The foundation is a piece of scrapbook paper designed by Tim Holtz. On top of that is a quilted collage that is stitched together, made entirely of paper items, which in turn has been stitched down to the foundation. The top layer is one of my stitched collages made from both fabric and paper that did not suit me after it was done, so I cut it up into heart shapes to use on future stitched collages. The “waste” as it might be called, was then stitched overtop the two previous pieces. This is one of those items that loses a little in photographic translation…it is easier to see what you are looking at IRL and to discern what it is.

These school photos were blown up on the copier and turned into portraits for display in the Ozark Playgrounds Association handbook. Official member boy has his Bingo wagon with him, and Office member girl brought her doll. I will very likely white wash the map so that I can journal in that space ultimately. I finally remembered I have rubber stamps to use in my journal with this new journal and have been trying to pull some out and print. I almost always stamp in black ink, although I have other colors, and I almost always use Staz-ON even though I have other brands. I like that Staz-on goes over anything and under water and mediums. I am sure not the world’s best stamper as you can tell, but I even like when the images is rough, sort of like an abstract memory in this case. Half faded away.